Amy Mottl, MD, MPH

Amy Mottl, MD, MPH

6008 Burnett-Womack
Office: 919-445-2641
Appts: 984-974-5706

UNC Health Care Profile

Associate Professor of Medicine

Specialty Areas: Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of Diabetic Kidney Disease; Genetic Epidemiology of Diabetic Nephropathy, FSGS and Cystic Diseases of the Kidney; Fabry Disease

Chronology: BS Summa Cum Laude: Northeastern University, 1993; MD Alpha Omega Alpha: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1999; Intern/Resident: University of North Carolina, 1999-2002; Nephrology Fellow: University of North Carolina, 2002-2005; MPH in Epidemiology UNC School of Public Health 2006; Clinical Instructor: University of North Carolina, 2005-2007; Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine: 2007-2012; Medical Director: Fresenius Dialysis Center of Mebane, NC, 2012-present; Associate Professor of Medicine: University of North Carolina, 2012-present.

Dr. Mottl's research has involved investigation of genetic and epidemiologic risk factors of chronic kidney disease, with an emphasis on diabetic kidney disease. 

She is especially interested in pathogenic mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy and how these may vary between those with and without proteinuria. She is being funded through 2017, by a career development award from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)  to study whether there are different pathologic and clinical manifestations of diabetes on the kidney and how these relate to diabetic complications of the eye. Dr. Mottl is a renal consultant to the multicenter, NIH and CDC funded study:  ‘SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth’ which is an epidemiologic cohort of children with type 1 or 2 diabetes. One of the fundamental aims of this study is to track the incidence, risk factors and natural history of microvascular complications of diabetes diagnosed during childhood. Dr. Mottl’s long-term goal is to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms in diabetic microvascular complications for the purpose of targeting novel therapies.  

View list of publications on PubMed.